Dog breeds

how to take care of a havanese puppy

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Last Updated: May 27, 2019 References Approved

This article was co-authored by Pippa Elliott, MRCVS. Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS is a veterinarian with over 30 years of experience in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice. She graduated from the University of Glasgow in 1987 with a degree in veterinary medicine and surgery. She has worked at the same animal clinic in her hometown for over 20 years.

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The Havanese is Cuba’s national dog and they make great companions. This long-haired, small dog is smart, playful, and cute. However, the long, double coat on this dog means that owners must put lots of time and effort into keeping the dog well-groomed. [1] X Trustworthy Source American Kennel Club The American Kennel Club (AKC) is a purebred dog pedigree registry in the United States. The AKC advocates for the responsible ownership of dogs and promotes purebred dog events, such as the Westminster Dog Show. Go to source Not tending to a Havanese’s coat could cause him to be covered in painful mats and can even interfere with his vision. If you have a Havanese, then you will need to learn all about how to feed, groom, train, and protect him.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Havanese dogs are the national dog breed of Cuba. They are a type of Bichon, which is a small breed of dog. It is believed that the Havenese breed stems from several cross breedings in order to have reached the final product. The Blanquito and the poodle are two that it is said to be a part of the Havanese lineage. Havanese are also referred to as the “Havana Silk Dog,” due to their long, silky fur. Their tails are long and they carry them over their backs, similar to that of a Shih-Tzu. Their personalities are energetic and high-spirited and they walk with a spring in their step, a gait that distinguishes them from all other breeds. This breed loves people and they are highly adaptable to family environments. They love and need to be well socialized and will become depressed if they are not. They do not do well if they have to be isolated from people or are left alone for long periods of time. Although they are small in stature, they are not considered toy breeds. The average weight is 10-16 pounds and can be 8.5-11.5 inches in height. If you are considering a Havanese puppy for your family, keep reading to learn 7 important tips for caring for your Havanese puppy.

1. Create a routine

Like children, puppies thrive on routine. It is important to start your puppy on a daily routine as soon as possible. Creating a routine helps to adapt your puppy to your lifestyle as well as it helps develop structure and discipline. When your puppy knows what to expect, they are better able to focus on training and will receive your instruction better and quicker, such as, making him sit before you attach his leash before walks, as opposed to allowing him to be jumping around while you try to attach it. Routine can be, putting your puppy in his crate at the same time every day for crate training, walks that are set at the same time each day, feedings, exercise and playtime. When your puppy develops his routine, he will feel secure knowing what each day will bring and helps to relax him and keep him stress-free from puppy-hood, to adulthood. This is an important part of taking care of your Havanese puppy for a happier, healthier dog.

2. Crate train

Crate training your puppy is one step that will help give your dog boundaries in your home and help to train him in multiple ways, including housebreaking. Letting your new Havanese puppy have free reign over your home will only create chaos and lots of messes you won’t want to deal with. Many people feel bad for putting their puppy in a crate. They view it as cruel or maybe that they are punishing their puppy. The reality is, that crates serve as a sense of security for you puppy, even as they get older. Dogs are naturally drawn to a den-like environment. Dens make dogs feel safe and secure, and crates are one way to help create the same security for them. They also help to train your puppy what his boundaries in your home are. They prevent him from getting into your personal property and chewing, or having accidents on your floor. Crate training should start right away when you get your new puppy, to introduce him to it and start him on learning what is expected of him in his new home.

3. Feedings

Your puppy will require a good, nutritious diet. Feeding your Havanese puppy high quality dog food is important to good health and nutrition. You can find out what food your breeder had him on and keep to the same brand of food. If you switch food brands, it’s important to make a gradual change, adding a little of the new brand each meal, increasing the amount each time for a week or more, until eventually the food is all new brand. Table scraps may be tempting to give your pup, but human food can be disruptive to your puppy’s digestive system, even adult dogs.

4. Discipline

Disciplining your puppy for his wrong behavior is part of training, however, disciplining in anger will frighten your puppy, confuse him and create a fear of you rather than respect for being the pack leader. Never hit your Havanese puppy, not even in scolding. Use a stern tone to give your command without incorporating his name in a negative, scolding tone. Being consistent with disciplining lets him know his behavior is not what is expected from you, and he will learn quicker when you discipline him for bad behavior – chewing, running away, jumping on furniture, whatever you expect from your new puppy.

5. Socialize your puppy

Socializing your puppy is a critical in properly caring for your Havanese puppy. It is not only beneficial for you and others, but for your puppy. You do not want your puppy growing up afraid of everything and everyone. Getting him acquainted with different situations, people, pets, and environments means your puppy will grow into a well adjusted adult who can be easy-go-lucky and not stressed, anxious or aggressive in a variety of situations, or around other people other than you.

6. Health checks

Your breeder should have gotten all of your puppy’s first shots and check-up, however, it’s important to make sure you follow-up with your vet on the routine checks your breeder recommends. Keeping your dog healthy with routine veterinary check-ups helps to keep your dog healthy. Regular checks means the sooner medical conditions are caught, the easier and quicker they can be treated.

7. Playtime

Havanese dogs are spirited little dogs that are well-kept in small environments – small houses, apartments, etc. Although they are little, you will still want to get your pup outside to walk or have playtime in the house to let him get his exercise and energy out. Playtime also helps to get your pup’s mind active so that he doesn’t get bored. Bored dogs can mean destructive dogs, so be sure to include plenty of playtime in your Havanese pup’s day.

Havanese dogs may not be as popular as Pomeranians but they’re up there! They’re little, excitable, and adorable dogs. So if you’re considering buying a Havanese dog, you’ve come to the right place. This article right here talks about how much it costs to own a Havanese.

The question of how much a Havanese cost is simple enough. But its answer is not quite so. You can look at either the initial cost of owning a Havanese or you could factor in ‘common costs’. They are the cost of training, food, health checks, toys, etc.

I don’t know if you’ve guessed it yet. But Havanese dogs come from Cuba. They’re not only loyal but quite affectionate and enthusiastic. They would climb mountains to please you but the only difference is that they’d do it cleverly.

If you really want to buy a Havanese dog, read the following information.

Table of Contents

How Much Does a Havanese Cost?

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

A Havanese isn’t all that expensive to own. Their coat remains as is considering they are a non-shedding breed. You don’t need to invest a lot of money in food since they require very little exercise and so have a smaller appetite. Toys and training are a must to keep them stimulated and happy.

So all things considered, how much does a Havanese cost?

The ideal cost of buying a Havanese is between 1000 to 1500 dollars. Even for a purebred, this is the recommended buying price. You can expect to go 100-500 dollars above if you want special, long-term certification.

The prices of Havanese dogs vary depending upon location. Where are you buying a Havanese from? Is it a high-end seller? Or a rescue shelter? Or somewhere that meets right in the middle but with proper AKA certification?

Buying a Havanese puppy is more expensive than an adult dog. In fact, some breeders offer a discount. If you’re willing to overlook the puppies and take home an adult Havanese instead.

Some people contact a breeder directly for a purebred Havanese. Keeping in mind the dog’s pedigree, heritage, and medical history. Making sure you trust the breeder is important.

However, over-breeding dogs are not the ideal setting. When there are already so many pups on the market to be sold. Don’t you think you’re better off looking for a Havanese? One that’s already been born and has the same potential you’re looking for.

Factors That Affect Cost

Keep in mind that if you buy a purebred dog , it’s going to cost you a lot more. Nevertheless, Havanese dogs don’t come cheap. Their initial costs range from 1000 to 15000. But in some cases, it may go up to 2500 dollars.

For shows, purebred Havanese, there are so many factors to take into consideration.

1. Age

If you’re willing to buy a Havanese for shows and competitions, you wouldn’t mind getting an adult. But most people prefer buying a puppy from 5-8 weeks. This is the ideal age to bond with the dog. And it defines the formative years of a Havanese for training, feedback, etc.

Hence, the price of a Havanese puppy is higher and more in demand. Adult Havanese dogs are already trained and vetted. It’s on you to decide what age you want to buy. Such dogs may come with behavioral issues. Otherwise, they’re rescues or bred for shows and competitions itself.

The latter factor may increase the cost of a Havanese a bit. But it’s definitely not going to be as expensive as buying a puppy.

2. Registration / Certification

This is to validate the quality and heritage of the Havanese. People looking for a new home pet won’t bother about this factor a lot. It’s for the people looking to enroll their dogs in shows and competitions.

Looking for the terms “CKC” or “AKC” for proper registration. This means the breeder is certified, reliable, and follows certain rules for purebred.

If you’re rescuing a Havanese from a shelter, there are papers for that too. The dog’s medical history, certificates of his/her parents, date of admission, etc. This knowledge will help you even if you’re looking for a home pet. To know if your dog is sick and how you can treat him/her and medication bills.

Havana Silk Dog, Bichon Havanais, Havanese Cuban Bichon

Though the Havanese is a toy dog, this companion dog has a sturdy build for its size!

The Havanese are one of the Bichon breeds and were developed in Cuba. Also known as the Havanese Silk Dog, they have a long. wavy to curly soft coat. They were a favorite of the upper class. but when many Cubans fled to the United States they had to leave their Havanese dogs behind. This lead to the near demise of the breed. It was with a strong American interest in the 1970’s, and only 11 dogs in the country, that dedicated breeders were able to bring these dogs back from the edge of extinction to become one of the fastest growing breeds. There is a common variation in the breed that is known as the Shavanese, and it has a short smooth coat rather than the long wavy coat of the Havanese dog.

Havanese make wonderful companions for individuals and families. They are loving, playful, and obedient. They will get along with just about everyone and all other pets, though strangers will need to be established as welcome in your home for them to warm up to them. They are very intelligent and train easily. Most do not bark excessively, but they do make good watchdogs. This breed makes a wonderful apartment dog.

When selecting a Havanese, one of the primary concerns is eye problems. The breed is prone to several of them. Luxating patellas are also fairly common in the Havanese.

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Mammalia
  • Order: Carnivora
  • Family: Canidae
  • Genus: Canis
  • Species: lupus familiaris

Havanese, Havana Silk Dog, Bichon Havanais, and Havanese Cuban Bichon

The Havanese is a toy breed. Although the Havanese has always been a companion breed, it has a sturdy build for its size.

The Havanese is one of the Bichon breeds. Developed in Cuba, it was once a favorite of the upper class of the country. Its popularity waned during the Cuban Revolution, when many Cubans fled to the United States and were unable to bring their dogs along. Numbers dwindled due to a sharp decrease in breeding. Americans gained interest in the Havanese in the 1970s, but there were only 11 of the breed in the country. But more dogs were brought in from other countries, and the breed began to make a comeback. Today it is one of the fastest growing breeds according to AKC registration. A fairly common variation in the breed is known as the Shavanese. These dogs are born with short, smooth coats due to the inheritance of two recessive genes. This is considered a fault, and these dogs may not be shown.

The Havanese is a small dog with a sturdy build and rugged look. Its eyes are almond shaped and usually black, and its ears hang down at medium length. The tail is long and curves over the back. The coat of the Havanese is long, silky, and wavy or curly. All colors are acceptable for showing. Chocolate Havanese differ from the other colors in that they have green or amber eyes and a brown nose and lips. Havanese are 8 to 11 inches tall and weigh 7 to 13 pounds.

Care and Feeding

Havanese are prone to digestive difficulties, so it is important to monitor their diets carefully. The diet should include 20 to 30 percent fat, as well as adequate amounts of fruits, vegetables and carbohydrates. Pet Havanese are often clipped short to make grooming easier. If the coat is kept long, it must be brushed and combed regularly to remove mats and dead hair. The feet will need to be trimmed periodically. Nails should be clipped as needed, and teeth brushed once a week. Havanese are generally healthy dogs, but they need annual checkups to maintain their good health. Vaccinations for Havanese dogs are due on the following schedule:

  • 6-8 weeks: Distemper, Leptospirosis, Hepatitis, Parainfluenza, Parvo, and Corona virus (DHLPPC)
  • 10-12 weeks: Second DHLPPC
  • 14-16 weeks: Third DHLPPC and rabies
  • Annually: DHLPPC and rabies booster

In general, Havanese Silk Dogs do not shed, making them a good breed for allergy sufferers. However the short-haired Havanese, the Shavanese, do shed some hair. Regular vacuuming should be adequate.

Housing Your Dog

Havanese are best suited to indoor life. They can thrive in small spaces as long as they get enough exercise.

The delightful Havanese has a way of getting along with everyone. It is great with children and other dogs. It also does well with strangers once it is established that they are welcome in your home.

Handling and Training

Havanese are easy to train for obedience, and they excel at doing tricks. They are sensitive dogs, so it is important to use positive reinforcement for best results.

The Havanese needs a daily walk to keep him happy and healthy. This playful breed enjoys the opportunity to run off-leash, but does not need frequent strenuous exercise.

Litter size may be up to nine puppies. When choosing a mate for your Havanese, check bloodlines for eye problems and luxating patellas.

Common Health Problems

Eye problems common to the Havanese include progressive retinal atrophy, retinal dysplasia, and cataracts. These ailments may require medical treatment, possibly including surgery. Other health problems that may be bothersome in the breed include luxating patella and dry skin.

Havanese are reasonably easy to find. Breeders may be located online if you can’t find one in your local area. Prices are often over $1,000.

Small, sturdy, and loaded with charm, the Havanese is a dog that effortlessly coaxes happiness from its owners. But while the breed’s fluffy coat and famously springy step are poised to make you smile, will welcoming one into your home be too much for your wallet to bear?

Havanese at a Glance

Hailing from Cuba, the Havanese is a friendly powderpuff of a dog known for its sharp mind and eagerness to please. It’s a breed that loves to play, yet it doesn’t need a ton of exercise to keep a happy disposition. The Havanese is also a non-shedding dog, making him an excellent choice for those afraid of constantly having to sweep up dog hair.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

And the Average Cost of a Havanese is…

Typically, you can expect to shell out around $1,000 to $1,500 for a purebred Havanese puppy. There are several factors that create this price range, including location of the pup and AKC certification. You can get a discounted doggie rate if you’re willing to forego the puppy years.

If you are in the market for a purebred Havanese, it is prudent to make sure you work with a trustworthy breeder. You will also want to make sure that you have some knowledge of your future pup’s heritage, so you can be aware of any potential medical issues that may show up within his lifetime. A reputable breeder should have this information readily available for you, along with other pertinent details.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

The Secondary Costs of a Havanese

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

As with any breed, the Havanese is going to demand a chunk of your monthly income to be a happy dog. Obviously, this will include regular visits to the vet, licensing, shots, and food. You can usually expect these costs to be part of your budget for a substantial period of time, as the Havanese typically has a lifespan of 15 years.

The major cost that separates the Havanese apart from other breeds is the amount of coin you may have to drop on grooming. One of the most distinguishing features of the breed is its double coat, which can be either fluffy or silky. The type of coat your Havanese has and the length you wish to keep it at, will dictate how expensive the grooming process can be.

If you want your Havanese’s fur long, be prepared to bathe him weekly and groom and brush him daily. If you’d prefer to keep his fur short, you’ll need to bathe him every other week and take him to a groomer for a proper haircut about every six to eight weeks. Either way, you’re going to have to spend extra cash to keep him looking healthy and handsome.

Owning a Havanese will Cost You Time

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Obviously, you will have to put in a healthy chunk of time with your Havanese to ensure good coat health. But taking care of his fur is not the only potential time suck you’ll be dealing with if you own one of these dogs. For instance, this breed tends to feature nails that grow very rapidly and teeth that are subject to dental issues; two aspects of grooming that are going to demand an extra measure of care compared to other breeds.

The Havanese’s smarts can be a bit of a curse if you aren’t careful. If he gets bored, he may get into the kind of mischief that could cost you money if not properly trained. And because the breed is bright enough to know what gets attention, he may constantly be near you looking to please – something that may be a nuisance if you want alone time.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

You Can’t Help But Adore this Breed!

The Havanese breed was trained to be a circus dog back in the day, and these three-ring roots help these fun little dogs shine brightly. If you want a small, smart people-pleaser that will stop at nothing to put a smile on your face, then this is the breed for you. Needless to say, the Havanese you pick up will be very happy that you brought him home.

The Havanese is one of the cutest lap dogs you can ever own. They have the most affectionate, the kindest personality that makes them a perfect choice for families with small children. Furthermore, they are also excellent companion dogs for people of all ages.

A descendant of the European Bichon, the Havanese is an ancient breed that was introduced to Cuba by the Spaniards. The breed got their name after the capital of Cuba and was mainly a companion to many Cuban aristocrats. Because they are the only breed that is native to Cuba, the Havanese became the official national dog of Cuba.

Why choose Havanese?

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Sweet and gentle nature

Aside from their personality, the Havanese is known for their unique physical attributes. Their coat is long and silky and also covers their ears. The breed also comes in a rainbow of colors ranging from beige, cream, gold, black, silver and brown and can be a combination of all colors. With their gentle temperament, they make a great canine companion for families with children and to people of all ages.

They don’t shed very much

They require moderate grooming as well as a minimal amount of daily exercise. They love to spend time with their humans and can adapt well to indoor living. The Havanese is also an excellent choice for families who don’t have a lot of time to spend walking their pets. They can also be great pets for apartment dwellers since they don’t need a lot of exercise.

Ideal family pet

The breed is well-mannered and is eager to please. With quality time spent together, the breed can become extremely devoted. Naturally docile and affectionate, the pups are playful and can become a sweet furry friend. To ensure that your Havanese pet stays healthy and happy, make sure that you look for ways to take care of them properly. Training, adequate socialization, grooming and lots of affection from their owners are all that’s important for the Havanese.

Grooming Havanese dogs is very important to keep their wavy, flowing coat as it is. Before you bring home a Havanese dog, keep in mind that this dog requires a lot of dog grooming care. The following article will cover some of the Havanese grooming tips for this wonderful dog.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Grooming Havanese dogs is very important to keep their wavy, flowing coat as it is. Before you bring home a Havanese dog, keep in mind that this dog requires a lot of dog grooming care. The following article will cover some of the Havanese grooming tips for this wonderful dog.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Havanese dogs are also known as Bichon Havanais, Havana Silk dog and Bichon Havanese. They are known as non-shedding dogs as they shed less compared to other dog breeds. These are low shedding dogs that require high dog grooming sessions.

Caring for Havanese Puppies

You need to begin grooming Havanese puppies by getting them used to the grooming table. You should keep a rubber mat or carpet to prevent the dog from slipping. You need to follow some dog training tips to teach your Havanese puppies to lie down or stand. They need to feel relaxed and you should give them a lot of attention. You should keep scratching behind the ears or chest and keep a hand under the stomach while grooming Havanese puppies. This helps calm the animal and build confidence in the young pup as you comb through his coat. Thus, grooming Havanese puppies helps them learn early on that this exercise is a pleasurable experience and a routine that he has to follow. Be sure you give them treats and praise him a lot for good behavior after grooming.

Caring for Havanese Dogs

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These dogs need to be cleaned regularly as their coats get matted and tangled easily. Havanese dogs need to be groomed at least 2 to 4 times a week. The coat needs to be brushed and combed. It also needs to be trimmed as it grows as long as 6 to 8 inches. The grooming sessions not only involves the coat, but also the eyes, ears, paws as well teeth. Let us have a look at the various grooming aspects of a Havanese dog.

Brushing

Brushing is very important at it will help keep your dog’s coat in a top condition. Brushing helps remove the dead hair and thus, keep the dog low shedding. It also helps provide a gentle massage to the dog and improves blood circulation. This also gives you ample opportunity to watch out for a flea or tick infestation or some hidden injuries.

When brushing, place your dog on a flat table. Make the dog sleep in its side. Take a small brush with fine metal teeth. Start brushing in layers, starting from the top side of its front leg. All your brush to move against the fall of the hair when you reach the shoulder. Follow the same steps for the rear legs.

Use a large brush with metal teeth to comb the top layer of hair from the shoulder to the buttocks. Comb against the growth of the hair. As you move down to the abdomen, comb the lower hair layer downwards. After you complete the lower region in layers, move towards the neck, chest, buttocks, tails and flank. Then make the dog stand up and brush down all the hair that you just completed combing. Make the dog lie on its other side and brush just as you did for the first side.

If the dogs coat is tangled or matted, make sure you wet the coat with a spray bottle. Use water or detangler/conditioner mix to help remove the mat in hair. Use a comb or your fingers to pull apart the tangles or mats. Oiling the hair is also important. Apply a bit of oil at least every 15 days. Before you schedule a bath, apply oil to the hair when brushing. You can apply oil to the comb teeth and pass it through the hair. The best oil to use is cooking oil. This helps in preventing the hair from getting dry, especially during winter.

Bathing the Dog

Bathing depends on the color and lifestyle of the dog. If you have a white Havanese dog that gets to spend more time outdoors, it is better to give him a weekly wash. A Havanese dog that generally lives indoors will require to be bathed once a month. Place cotton balls in the ears of the dog to prevent any water from entering the ear canal. Use a no tear shampoo and conditioner to wash the dog. After rinsing the dog well, allow air dry. You can let the dog shake off the excess water from its body.

You will see that Havanese dogs with a bright white coat develop red or discolored hair around the eyes. You need to wash the skin with a soft cotton ball or cloth near the eye. The discoloration will reduce with regular cleaning. The long, floppy ears need to be cleaned regularly to avoid dog ear infections. You should clean the ears with a washcloth and cotton swab and remover the hair in the ears with tweezers or your fingers. Do not go deep into the ear canal or you may injure the dog.

Clipping Nails

Grooming also involves clipping of nails. You need to hold your pup or dog still and separate the toes. Then, cut one nail and praise the dog a lot. Move on the other nail and continue to praise the dog to avoid it from panicking. Nails need to be clipped regularly or they will grow too long. It is always better to visit a professional groomer for dog nail clipping to avoid injury. You should also ask them to clip the fur on the paw as it may form a cushion like layer and cause the dog to slip on a smooth surface.

Cleaning Teeth

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To avoid plaque building up in the teeth of your dog, you need to brush the Havanese teeth and gums regularly. You should use special dog toothpaste to brush the teeth.

You can even get a haircut for your Havanese dog. Many owners go in for Havanese grooming styles like puppy cut, teddy bear or drop coat trim. The dog ends up looking like a cute, cuddly stuffed toy that will earn a lot of ‘Ooh’s’ and ‘Ooo’s’ and ‘Soooo Cute’ from admirers. You need to continue brushing, combing and grooming the dogs couple of times a week. This will help prevent mats and tangles in the coat.

Characteristics, History, Care Tips, and Helpful Information for Pet Owners

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

The Havanese dates back to 1500s Cuba and is a small and sturdy dog with a playful, affectionate personality. Overall, these smart dogs are good-natured and make great family dogs. They are highly trainable and can learn tricks and perform in agility and obedience competitions. This clever dog will also make up its own games and train you to play them with him. The Havanese may also be used as a visiting therapy dog, especially if the dog has been well-socialized to not be timid with strangers.

Breed Overview

Group: Toy

Height: 8.5 to 11.5 inches

Weight: 7 to 13 pounds

Coat and Colors: The breed may have one or two colors including, but not limited to, black, silver, white, cream, tan, fawn, gold, sable, and red. Its coat can vary drastically from silky straight to very wavy with ringlets.

Life Expectancy: 14 to 16 years

Characteristics of the Havanese

Affection Level High Friendliness High Kid-Friendly High Pet-Friendly High Exercise Needs Medium Playfulness High Energy Level Medium Trainability High Intelligence Medium Tendency to Bark Low Amount of Shedding Low

History of the Havanese

The Havanese is the national dog of Cuba, an old breed and only native breed that was developed in Cuba when its canine ancestors came to Cuba from Spain in the early 1500s by way of Tenerife in the Canary Islands—the “islands of the dogs.” The breed is believed to share lineage with the bichon. The Havanese was a beloved pet of Cuban aristocrats and later became popular among wealthy Europeans, including Queen Victoria and Charles Dickens. This purebred dog is rare to find in Cuba now as the island is overrun with mixed-breed strays.

The Havanese has been in the U.S. since the Cuban revolution in 1959 when only 11 dogs were left to save the breed from extinction. It has thrived in the U.S. and Europe, and the breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1996.

Havanese Care

Because of its silky coat type, routine grooming is an absolute necessity for the Havanese dog breed. Brush your Havanese often, at least once or twice per week (more often if the coat is kept long). If you don’t have the time to do this, the Havanese may not be the dog for you. Many Havanese owners choose to keep a shorter coat, in which case haircuts may be necessary every few weeks. Their coat protects them from the sun and they tolerate hot weather well and cold weather moderately.

Despite its silk-like coat, the Havanese does not shed much. Be aware that less shedding does not mean the dog is hypoallergenic.

Like all dogs, the Havanese should receive proper training. These dogs are intelligent and attentive, therefore they tend to learn quickly. General training will contribute to your dog’s overall happiness, as well as your own.

As a moderately active little dog, the Havanese should get daily exercise but does not need a lot of it. With the proper outlets for their energy, these dogs are content to cuddle on your lap or play indoors. In fact, they can be great for city and apartment living.

If you want a small dog with a relatively easygoing demeanor, the Havanese might be right for you. This breed tends to do quite well with children and other dogs. The friendly and gentle temperament of the Havanese makes this breed suitable for many types of homes, including apartments. They also can be a great dog to have for travel and RV living as they are small and do not bark much.

However, a Havanese will not do well if you must leave it alone for long periods. They crave companionship, are known to have separation anxiety, and may develop destructive habits due to being unhappy and bored.

One drawback is that the Havanese can take longer to housebreak. You will need to be consistent during this period or provide a doggy door so the dog has access to the outside. Many of them don’t like to get wet, so it’s good to have a covered area available. On the other hand, if they grow up around water, they can be good swimmers. In general, the Havanese should be an indoor dog.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Common Health Problems

Responsible breeders strive to maintain the highest breed standards as established by kennel clubs like the AKC. Dogs bred by these standards are less likely to inherit health conditions. However, some hereditary health problems can occur in the breed.

The following are some conditions to be aware of:

  • Deafness: This is often a congenital condition in the Havanese.
  • Patellar Luxation: This is a loose knee joint that can lead to lameness and knee arthritis.
  • Hip Dysplasia: While this is often thought to be a condition for large dogs, the Havanese are also prone to hip dysplasia. This can cause pain and lameness.
  • Elbow Dysplasia: Havanese are also prone to elbow dysplasia and may need surgery.
  • Hypothyroidism: The Havanese has a high rate of underactive thyroid glands and may it require treatment through the dog’s life.
  • Allergies: The Havanese can have skin allergies to fleas, grass, and pollen, causing the dog to scratch and chew itself.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Diet and Nutrition

Feed your Havanese two meals a day with a total of one-half to one cup of dry dog food. Don’t leave out food for free-feeding or you may discover weight gain; obesity can reduce a dog’s lifespan and lead to other conditions. Discuss any weight gain with your veterinarian and what type of feeding schedule, food, and exercise is appropriate for your dog.

Avoid giving people food to your Havanese. Be aware that they are tricksters and can train you to feed them some of your food if you aren’t vigilant. Be consistent and ensure everyone in your family is as well.

Last Updated on April 20, 2020

Blessed with abundant silky hair and a spirited personality, the Havanese is valued as a true companion dog and family pet. Like other dogs of the Bichon type, the Havanese has a short snout, large eyes, and drop ears. Below, we show you how to groom a Havanese face.

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The Havanese is a beautiful dog with a sweet temperament. It’s also the national dog of Cuba, where the Havanese breed was first developed. If you’re the lucky owner of one of these adorable dogs, you’ll want to keep him regularly groomed so that his coat stays soft and shiny and his face stays as cute as ever.

Table of Contents

Bathing and drying

Remember that every time you bathe your Havanese, his coat loses the natural oils that keep it smooth and glowing. If you live in a warm and humid climate, the Havanese only needs to be bathed monthly and only if he is dirty. In colder climates, the dog should be bathed less frequently.

If your dog isn’t too dirty, a sprinkling of baby powder should be enough to keep his coat clean. Because the Havanese has drop ears, it is prone to ear infections. Regularly wipe the outer ears with a damp cloth dipped in ear cleaning solution.

After a bath, blow dry your pet’s coat on a low heat setting as you gently brush the hairs out, starting from the layers closest to the skin. Use a wide-toothed metal comb or a brush for the body and a smaller metal comb for the face.

Havanese dogs should be combed daily to keep their coat from getting matted or tangled.

Eye care

Havanese dogs sometimes tear up. Their tears combine with dirt below their eyes and leave goopy tear stains that you should regularly clean out. To get rid of these tear stains, wipe around your dog’s eyes and nose with a soft damp cloth.

If the tears have crusted up, use cotton pads dipped in a saline solution to soften the gunk and wipe it away. After you have cleaned around the eyes, use a small-toothed comb to remove tangles in the area.

To keep your Havanese’s face clean and to keep his hair out of his eyes, you can tie the head on his hair up in a topknot. Just make sure that the hair isn’t being pulled too tight or getting broken.

How to work out tangles

If your dog’s hair is tangled or matted, you need to detangle it before you give him a bath. You can spray a ready-made detangler solution or a mixture of water and dog conditioner onto his coat before gently pulling a wide-toothed comb through the tangles, taking care not to pull out his hair.

Do your best not to cut out any knots. Instead, gently untangle matted hair with your fingers or with a mat-and-tangle comb.

Regularly comb your Havanese’s coat and check for tangles to avoid dealing with severely matted or tangled fur. According to the American Kennel Club, the coat of Havanese dogs should be groomed every day.

How to clean the face of your Havanese

Havanese dogs have very hairy faces that tend to be littered with dried up dog food and other stuff they get their muzzles in, like leaves, grass, gravel, and soil.

First, clean out your dog’s eyes, nose, and mouth area as described above. Then use a liquid tangle remover spray to smoothen out any tangles in the facial hair. Leave the detangling solution in the soiled or matted hair while you brush or comb your dog’s body.

Havanese dogs have an abundance of soft, silky hair.

By the time you’re done combing out your dog’s torso and limbs, the solution would have soaked into his facial hair and loosened the tangles. After you’ve worked the tangles out, comb the rest of his face with a fine-toothed comb. Don’t forget to do his beard and the corners of his eyes.

Trimming Havanese facial hair

Hair trimming or clipping is best done by a professional. But if you have the tools, you can try giving your Havanese a trim at home.

After detangling, bathing, drying, and combing your Havanese, use dog clippers to trim the hairs on the sides of his face. Swipe from above the ears, down the cheeks, and down towards the beard. Trim the hair on the inner corners of his eyes with thinning shears.

Get a comb and trim the hair on the sides of the muzzle. Comb out the top of the head and round it off. Trim the hair on the cheeks, jawline, and under the ears.

Comb the hair on the ears and trim them into a slightly rounded shape. If you want to highlight the eyes of your Havanese, trim the outer corners of the eyes.

Don’t trim too much hair off because the more hair you remove, the less your pooch will resemble a Havanese. Don’t shave the coat down to the skin because this leaves your Havanese vulnerable to sunburn and the many potential diseases that can result, including infections and skin cancer.

The younger your Havanese is when you start regularly grooming him, the better it will be for the both of you. Just follow this guide on how to groom a Havanese face. When your pooch is regularly bathed and combed, he comes to expect it as part of his normal routine and the less fussy he will be during these sessions.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Dogs aren’t quite as dependent on their eyes as we are (nose, eyes, ears, remember?), but their vision is still a major way that dogs interact with the world. As the Pack Leader, you have to pay special attention to your dog’s eyes during her care routine.

Four common dog eye problems

Eye infections How do dogs get eye infections? Sometimes they just get something in their eye that has bacteria. Other times they may come into contact with another dog that’s infected.

Signs of a canine eye infection include excessive crying and whining, light sensitivity, redness, and green or yellow discharge that crusts over their eyes. Breeds prone to eye infections include cocker spaniels, Maltese, Pekingese, poodles, pugs, and Shih-Tzus.

Cataracts This largely genetic condition will make the lens of your dog’s eye appear increasingly white or cloudy, coinciding with a progressive deterioration in his vision and eventually blindness.

All dog breeds can develop cataracts, and it’s also possible to get them from disease, immune system problems, or injury. But some breeds are more susceptible than others. These include: American cocker spaniel, bichon frise, Boston terrier, Havanese, miniature schnauzer, miniature and standard poodle, silky terriers, and smooth fox terriers.

In-growing eyelids Also known as entropion, with this condition, your dog’s eyelids will actually grow or roll inwards, rubbing up against the cornea and causing damage and discomfort.

Though it can occur in any dog, entropion is a leading health concern in breeds such as the Akita, American Staffordshire terrier, bloodhound, Chinese Shar-Pei, chow chow, English bulldog, English mastiff, Great Dane, Neapolitan mastiff, Rottweiler, spaniel, vizsla, and Weimaraner.

Third eyelid prolapse This may sound strange, but every dog has a third eyelid. The gland of this eyelid protects the cornea by secreting tears. Sometimes, though, this gland can become swollen and exposed.

When that happens, you may see yellow mucus indicating the irritation. Brachycephalic or “flat-faced” breeds like the Pekingese, pug, and Shih-Tzu commonly have this problem.

How to take care of your dog’s eyes While each of the problems above are likely to require veterinary consultation and specific treatments to solve the issue, there are still a number of general things you can do to keep your dog’s eyes healthy and to catch things early on.

Gaze into her eyes Check your dog’s eyes regularly by taking her to a bright area and looking for crust, discharge, or tearing, and making sure that there’s white around the eyeball.

You should also watch out for cloudiness, unequal pupil sizes, a visible third eyelid, a change in eye color, closed eyes, or rubbing of the eyes. These are signs your dog needs to see the vet.

Check the lining While you’re there, look at the inner lining of his eyelid by rolling the lid down. You want it to be pink, not white or red.

Clean them out Keep her eyes free of gunk and crustiness by using a damp cotton ball and wiping outward from the corner of her eye, being careful not to scratch the cornea. Use dog eye wash if you see redness, which is common during dry winters.

Keep your dog clipped Long hair can scratch and poke your dog’s eyes, so trim those bangs using round-tip scissors.

Close the windows It might bring a smile to your face — and your dog’s — when they stick their head out the window while riding in the car, but wind and debris can actually cause serious eye problems.

Has your dog experienced eye problems? What course of treatment did you use and did it work?

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

The Havanese dog is a breed of dogs that originates from Cuba. These are small dogs with a fluffy and silky coat and love all people, children as well as other animals. As fuzzy as they are, Havanese dogs do not shed much, and unlike other small dog breeds, they do not tend to bark too much. They can be trained, and they are highly affectionate and playful, making them perfect companions for growing children. The life expectancy of Havanese dogs is about 14 to 16 years, meaning that they live a few years relatively more than most other breeds of dogs.

A Brief History Of Havanese Dogs

First and foremost to be known is that the Havanese dog is the national dog of Cuba and is native to the country. The dog’s ancestors of Spanish breeds that were brought to Cuba along with its invaders during the 16th Century. They were first brought to Cuba to a place called the islands of the dogs, i.e., the Canary Islands. Havanese dogs were a popular pet for European, and consequent Cuban aristocracy. Even Queen Victoria had a Havanese dog for a pet. There was a point in the history of these dogs where there weren’t all that many of them left in the world, just 11 individuals. However, their population has vastly increased today. You may adopt a Havanese dog at your local animal shelter or use online resources to find one to adopt. A few associations for Cuba’s national dog do exist in the United States, which you can contact if you wish to.

Common Havanese Dog Health Problems

Many dogs are susceptible to health issues, such as Labrador retrievers and golden retrievers, to chronic arthritis for their heavyweight. Similarly, there are specific health issues that Havanese dogs are also susceptible to. Some of these are as follows.

Deafness

Patellar luxation

This is when a joint in the knee is loose and can lead the dog to arthritis in the knees.

Hip Dysplasia

Some Havanese dogs in their old age may develop hip dysplasia and require surgery on their elbows to remedy this.

Hypothyroidism

Havanese dogs are highly susceptible to hyperthyroidism, owing to their underactive thyroid glands.

Allergies

Just like any other dogs, Havanese dogs may be allergic to grass and pollen, even to fleas.

Havanese Dog: Separation Anxiety

These friendly dogs are susceptible to separation anxiety if they are left alone for too long, which may even lead to destructive habits on the dog’s part. This is because Havanese dogs are amicable and loving and need to be around people or other animals always.

What To Feed A Havanese Dog?

What you feed your dog majorly adds to his or her health, which includes the fur coats, fatness or obesity, etc. It would be best if you fed your Havanese dogs two meals a day of certified, dry dog food. Since they are small dogs, you should feed them a total of about a half to one cup of this food. Over-feeding your dog may lead to your Havanese dogs becoming obese, which has its implications. With obesity comes arthritis, hip dysplasia, and other obesity-related diseases. The occasional treats are, of course, welcome, but be sure not to over-do it, ensuring that your dog does not become overweight.

Lhasa Apso Hairstyles

Havanese dogs have soft double coats that are silky or fluffy to the touch. Dogs of the Havanese breed shed very little, making them ideal pets for allergy sufferers. When choosing a hairstyle for your Havanese, consider the amount of upkeep and work you want to put into your dog’s coat. As long as you take care of the fur, just about any traditional hairstyle will look adorable on a pet Havanese.

Corded

Corded coats contain long locks of hair that look like dreadlocks or ropes. You can cord the Havanese coat by separating sections of hair and encouraging it to grow together. This is a time-consuming process. It usually takes two years for the coat to become fully corded. Corded coats require bathing but should never be brushed. At bath time, lather and rinse each cord. Squeeze out the excess water and thoroughly dry the coat to avoid mildew.

Long and Flowing

If left to grow long, the Havanese coat will reach 6 to 8 inches in length. Since the hair is soft, mats form easily. Daily brushing is critical to keep the coat in good condition. Fill a squirt bottle with water and a teaspoon of conditioner. Spray the coat, after shaking the bottle well each time, before brushing to avoid breaking or damaging the hair. Most mats form close to the skin and can be easily missed if you brush only the topcoat. Be sure to brush all the way down to the skin. Bathe your long-haired Havanese once a week to keep the coat free from dirt and debris.

Puppy Clip

A short clip is the easiest way to manage the voluminous Havanese coat. If you don’t have the time to keep your dog’s hair brushed and have no interest in painstakingly caring for cords, the puppy clip may be your hairstyle of choice. If you want the coat cut short, ask your groomer to use a #4 or #5 blade when trimming. The face should be left fluffy. The Havanese coat grows rapidly and will need to be trimmed every six to eight weeks and bathed every two weeks. If you are uncomfortable using clippers to trim your dog, take him to a professional groomer to avoid any injuries. A properly trimmed Havanese will look like a cuddly stuffed teddy bear.

Braids and Topknots

Braiding the hair on the top of your dog’s head is one means of keeping excess fur out of his eyes. After bathing and drying your Havanese, part the hair down the middle of the head and braid the two sections. Place a band on the top and the base of the braid to keep it from unraveling. You can otherwise create a single braid down the middle of your dog’s face. Redo braids daily. An alternative to braiding is the topknot. Gather the hair on your dog’s head into a large bunch and use a rubber band to pull it into a ponytail. Make sure the topknot is not so tight that it pulls the eyes upward.

Active, intelligent, happy and trainable, the Havanese breed is ideal for the guardian who wants a small dog that can be content with frequent walks and games of fetch.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Some Cubans, who fled to the U.S. during the revolution, brought their Havanese dogs, which became the foundation stock for the breed today.

Weight Range:

Male: 8-13 lbs. Female: 7-12 lbs.

Height at Withers:

Expectations:

Exercise Requirements: 20-40 minutes/day Energy Level: Very energetic Longevity Range: 10-15 yrs. Tendency to Drool: Low Tendency to Snore: Low Tendency to Bark: Moderate Tendency to Dig: Low Social/Attention Needs: High

Bred For:

Length: Medium Characteristics: Straight Colors: All colors and combinations including white Overall Grooming Needs: High

Club Recognition:

AKC Classification: Toy UKC Classification: Companion Dog Prevalence: Rare

Havanese are small dogs weighing seven to 13 pounds. The height ranges from 8 1/2 to 11 1/2 inches at the shoulder. The body is longer than tall; they have drop ears and a tail that curls over the back. Havanese generally mature at 1 year of age, although they reach their full size around 6 to 8 months.

The Havanese coat is straight or wavy. This dog was often called the “Havana silk dog” because the coat, while double-coated, feels like fine silk. The adult coat reaches a length of six to eight inches. Unlike the bichon, the Havanese comes in many colors including gold, black, blue, silver, cream, champagne, chocolate and any combination of the acceptable colors including tricolor and parti-color.

Personality:

Havanese are affectionate and happy dogs. They do not make good kennel dogs and prefer being with their owners. They are active dogs and enjoy learning tricks and playing games with their owners.

Havanese are intelligent and trainable. They need socialization to prevent them from becoming timid with strangers.

Living With:

Havanese need a large amount of interaction with people. They are generally good with other pets if properly socialized, and they enjoy outside activities.

The Havanese can be a good watchdog but poor guard dog because of the small size. Occasionally, one may bark excessively if not properly trained.

Havanese require brushing and combing three or more times a week to ensure a mat-free coat. They do not require trimming.

The Havanese breed is ideal for a person who wants a small, active dog who does not require a large yard and can be contented with frequent walks and games of fetch. These dogs do not do well left alone for long periods.

Havanese typically live from 10 to 15 years.

History:

The Havanese is an old breed from the bichon family. Originally, Tenerife dogs came to Cuba with Spanish farmers and noblemen in the early 1500s. These dogs developed into the Havanese with little, if any, outside influences.

In Havana, the breed became a family pet. By the 18th century, Europeans vacationing in Havana discovered the Havanese. The little dog quickly became a hit among Spanish, French and British nobility.

With Castro’s revolution, some Cubans who fled to the United States brought their Havanese with them. These 11 dogs became the foundation stock for the Havanese of today.

Havanese temperament, personality, training, behavior, pros and cons, advice, and information, by Michele Welton, Dog Trainer, Behavioral Consultant, Author of 15 Dog Books

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

One of the brightest and sturdiest of the toys, the Havanese is happy and playful and enjoys clever games of dexterity such as “pull the hidden toy from under the cabinet with your paw.”

Havanese are very people-oriented dogs, love snuggling in laps, and can be overly dependent — they don’t do well at all when left for long periods of time without companionship. “Not doing well” means unhappiness and boredom, which they may try to vent through barking and destructive chewing.

Though peaceful and gentle with everyone (humans and other pets), the Havanese can be conservative with strangers. Socialization is important to build a confident, outgoing temperament, as there is a potential for excessive caution/timidity.

Havanese do have an independent streak, but they are not a dominant breed. They respond well to training that includes food rewards and they especially love learning tricks. Many individuals excel in competitive obedience and agility.

The most problematic training issue is housebreaking — Havanese are slow to housetrain. Barking needs to be curtailed, as well. Many Havanese like to perch on the high back of a sofa or chair, looking out the window so they can announce visitors.

If you want a dog who.

  • Is small but sturdier than his tiny Maltese cousin
  • Doesn’t need much outdoor exercise (just daily walks, plus romps in a fenced yard
  • Is playful and entertaining
  • Makes a good watchdog, but is not aggressive
  • Has a long coat (which can be clipped short for easy maintenance)
  • Doesn’t shed much (one of the best breeds for allergy sufferers)
  • Is good with other pets

A Havanese may be right for you.

If you don’t want to deal with.

  • “Separation anxiety” (destructiveness and barking) when left alone too much
  • Shyness in some lines, or when not socialized enough
  • Frequent brushing and combing (unless regularly clipped short)
  • Mild stubbornness
  • Housebreaking difficulties
  • Barking

A Havanese may not be right for you.

Keep in mind that the inheritance of temperament is less predictable than the inheritance of physical traits such as size or shedding. Temperament and behavior are also shaped by raising and training.

  • You can avoid some negative traits by choosing an ADULT dog from an animal shelter or rescue group. With an adult dog, you can easily see what you’re getting, and plenty of adult Havanese have already proven themselves not to have negative characteristics.
  • If you want a puppy, you can avoid some negative traits by choosing the right breeder and the right puppy. Unfortunately, you usually can’t tell whether a puppy has inherited temperament or health problems until he grows up.
  • Finally, you can avoid some negative traits by training your Havanese to respect you and by following the 11-step care program in my book, 11 Things You Must Do Right To Keep Your Dog Healthy and Happy.

More traits and characteristics of the Havanese

If I was considering a Havanese, I would be most concerned about.

  1. How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Grooming. Coat care is a major responsibility. Havanese require weekly brushing and combing, and also clipping and trimming every couple of months. Otherwise their coat keeps growing and turns into a matted mass.

For ease of care, consider clipping the coat short so that brushing and combing is minimized. Then your Havanese will look like an adorable puppy throughout his life.

Housebreaking problems. The Havanese belongs to the same “family” of dogs as the Bichon Frise and Maltese and all of them are slow to housebreak. Consistent crate training is mandatory. Sometimes a doggy door is necessary so the dog can go out whenever he needs to (though that can lead to another problem if he stays outside and barks!). You will have greater success if the potty area is covered, since many Havanese despise getting wet. Read more on housebreaking your Havanese.

If the potential housebreaking problem sounds like a deal-breaker to you, don’t give up! Consider adopting an already-housebroken adult Havanese from a rescue group.

Potential separation anxiety. More than most other breeds, the Havanese needs a great deal of companionship and does not like being left alone for more than a few hours. He is likely to express unhappiness by barking or chewing things up.

Providing enough socialization. The Havanese tends to be a bit standoffish with strangers. If you don’t do enough socializing, or if you do it the wrong way, their natural caution might become shyness or suspiciousness. Read more on socializing your dog. Potential barking. Like most small dogs, the Havanese may be quick to bark when he hears or sees something new. But you can prevent your Havanese from developing a chronic barking habit by establishing the right relationship between the two of you, where you are the leader and he is the follower. When your Havanese respects you, he will follow your rules and stop what he’s doing when you tell him “No.” Read more about respect training. Potential health problems. Most Havanese are long-lived. But they are very prone to allergies that can disrupt their quality of life. Havanese can be allergic to fleas, grass, pollen, and so on. Allergies cause a dog to scratch and chew himself into horrendous skin conditions.

Other concerns in the breed are urinary problems and bladder stones, along with loose knee joints that may require surgery. Read more about Havanese Health.

About the author: Michele Welton has over 40 years of experience as a Dog Trainer, Dog Breed Consultant, and founder of three Dog Training Centers. An expert researcher and author of 15 books about dogs, she loves helping people choose, train, and care for their dogs.

To help you train and care for your dog

How to Care for Havanese Dogs Dog training videos. Sometimes it’s easier to train your puppy (or adult dog) when you can see the correct training techniques in action.

The problem is that most dog training videos on the internet are worthless, because they use the wrong training method. I recommend these dog training videos that are based on respect and leadership.

Sign up for our Free Havanese Mini Course to have a housebroken, obedient dog that happily comes to you every time you call.

You’ll learn new commands to obedience-train your dog as well as how to housebreak your dog in 6 days or less.

You’ll also learn how to eliminate bad habits like barking, nipping or biting, jumping, or pulling on the leash.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

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How to Care for Havanese Dogs

What Will This Free Havanese Mini Course Teach You?

Whereas other dog training related web sites and books offer generic information for dogs in general, ours is the ONLY web site that offers Havanese information specifically, from a renowned panel of experts – because as you probably know, Havaneses have their own special training requirements that other dogs don’t have.

Here’s just a small fraction of what you’ll learn in the course:

Who created this course?

The Havanese training information you will read here was developed by a panel of renowned dog training experts whose combined wisdom represents nearly 100 years of specialist experience training dogs.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Ty Brown

Ty is a renowned Dog Trainer who has been featured in National TV and Voice of America.

Ty has been training dogs since he was 14 years old. Today he is a renowned Dog Trainer who has been featured in National TV and Voice of America.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Sally Rushmore

Sally has 40 years of experience training dogs. She now teaches nearly 200 young dog owners, each year, to train their dogs.

Sally has 40 years of experience training dogs. In her current practice, she teaches nearly 200 young dog owners each year to train their dogs in obedience and agility.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Val Heart

An internationally recognized Animal Communicator, Val has authored 6 books on Animal Communication.

Val is an internationally recognized Expert Animal Communicator and Master Healer. She has authored 6 books on Animal Communication and has been featured in several TV and Radio shows.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Dr. Susan Lauten

With a Masters in Animal Nutrition and a Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences, Dr. Lauten is considered one of the foremost animal nutritionists in the U.S.

With a Masters in Animal Nutrition and a Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences, Dr. Lauten is considered one of the foremost animal nutritionists in the U.S.

875,000 dog owners have benefited already

875,000 dog owners have already taken the free mini course training and proven its power to breathe happy, obedient life into their Havaneses and inspire a loving new relationship with them. Join them by signing up for our FREE mini course and discover the fastest way to turn your Havanese into a loyal, friendly companion who’ll go to the ends of the earth for you.

“I was amazed at how quickly he (Button) picked up the commands. Your mini course taught me the most efficient, gentle, fun way to bond with my dog. My Havanese is my buddy now, . I can’t remember a time when I was any more proud.” – Ben Barlett, Jerome, Idaho

“Without this mini course, Ginger’s aggressiveness towards other dogs would have escalated. I would recommend everyone to get this course – you will be glad to get a well trained puppy at the end.” – Karla Robertson, Woodbridge, Virginia

“The mini-course gives insights into the way a Havanese thinks and reacts to behavior training. I have been able to stop T Bone’s chewing habits because of this course.” – Helen McCormick, Montvale, Virginia

“I trained Hamish from your Mini course. He is now an obedient dog, he understands all my commands, I feel proud when people comment on how well behaved he is.” – Doug Eames, Riga, Latvia

How to Care for Havanese DogsFeeding your Havanese until it is 6 months old on the food the breeder was using is very important. Do not give the puppy anything else but fresh water. This will keep your puppy from having serious problems. Anything else, treats, food from the table, greenies, can cause the pup to have soft bowels. Their digestive system is very fragile. They can chew on hooves and big white American made rawhides to teeth but they should not consume more than a tiny amount of them.

You can buy Old Mother Hubbard biscuits. They come in tiny sizes. Get the ones that are biscuit color. You can give one when you put the pup in the kennel at night to sleep, and break another one in half and offer ½ at time with 2 successful potty outings a day. The pup is only getting 2 a day. If this makes the pups bowels soft you will not be able to do this.

You will leave food down for your puppy at all times for the first three days after coming home with it. You can add a little warm water to it if you would like. Just remember moist food equals softer bowels. You can measure a lot about your pup’s health by watching that its bowels are consistent. The food and water are to be kept in the same place so the pup knows where it is. Day four you will feed it 3 x a day. Food is placed down for 15-20 minutes and picked up. At 6 months old, 2x a day. I feed 2x a day for life from that point on.

Publisher Description

The Ultimate Havanese Dog Manual has the answers you need when researching this intelligent, toy-sized purebred that is named after Havana in Cuba.

Find out whether or not this loyal, friendly, affectionate and cuddly companion canine with the mischievous personality and non-shedding fur, that is bred in a variety of colors, will be the perfect choice for you and your topdeblogs.com everything there is to know, including little known facts and secrets and how to care for every aspect of the Havanese’s life.

This manual contains all the information you need, from birth to the Rainbow Bridge, including transitioning through house breaking, care, feeding, training and end of life, so that you can make a well-informed decision about whether or not the Havanese is the breed for you. If you already have a Havanese, this book will teach you everything you need to know to make your dog a happy dog and to make you a happy dog topdeblogs.com author George Hoppendale is an experienced writer and a true animal lover. He enjoys writing animal books and advising others how to take care of their animals to give them a happy home.

Co-Author Asia Moore is a professional Dog Whisperer, Cynologist and Author, living on Vancouver Island, off the west coast of British Columbia, in Canada, who believes that all humans and dogs can live together in harmony. She and her dog whispering team, which includes an 8-year-old Shih Tzu named Boris, teach dog psychology to humans, to help alleviate problem behaviors that arise between humans and their canine counterparts so that everyone can live a happy and stress-free life topdeblogs.comred in this book:- Temperament- Vital statistics- Before you buy- Choosing the right dog- Health- Daily care- Feeding- House training- Medical care & safety- Grooming- Training- Poisonous Foods & Plants- Caring for your aging dog. and much more.

The picnic date took place on August 17, 2019 from 12pm to 5pm at Yvonne’s place in Brighton. Check out the details here. Photos from the 2019 picnic can be found here. Yvonne’s place is NEXT DOOR to her old place. I will try to put a havanese flag out front. Hope you can join us. Directions are here. The house # is 25. There is no picnic in 2020 due to COVID.

Want to see how I get a smooth coat and what equipment I use? I am continually learning and perfecting but I created this video Windows version) and for you Mac apple folks – here’s a conversion. – not a professional one, to help you get a head start and perfect your own skill. Got questions? Ask away.

Want to know how to create a bathing machine that will save you time, product and wash your dog better than ever before? Check out Dick and Irma’s instructions on how to create your own machine for a fraction of the cost.

Meet us at Woofstock. Dogs are welcomed. We meet at the restaurant across the street from Woodbine Park. Here is the location. Meet up happens on Xxxxx at 9:30 to 945am. Rain date is the next day. Look forward to seeing your havanese there and the humans too! Don’t have your havanese yet? Well join us anyway! There is no meet up in 2020 due to COVID.

Walks ‘N’ Wags Pet First Aid is a recognized National Pet First Aid Certificate course for dog and cat professionals and pet owners. Talemaker Havanese now has that certificate having taken and passed the course.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs Shoshi’s Wild Coat Havanese Coat Care Shoshi is our heart dog but she not only has a cottony coat but a thick, dense coat. It makes coat care difficult.

But I have learned a few things over the number of years of attempting to keep her knot free. I admit, I was at first frustrated, even shed a few tears but she did me the biggest favour. I soon learned that if I perfected my techniques on her, then the rest would be easy.

Unfortunately, no one had any real tips on Havanese coat care of the cotton type but cotton coats in the Havanese do exist. Thankfully none of my other dogs have her coat but if they did, I now know I could care for them.

I think I tried all the products, tools and much time in a state of frustration.

Here are some of the things I tried.

1. I cut her coat short. It helped but still knotted – just shorter coat to unknot. I didn’t like the look on her.

2. I used thinning shears to cut away from the skin and into the knot to break up the mats making it easier and it thinned out her coat.

3. I pulled the mats apart and either used my hands or a corner of a comb to break up the knot.

4. I tried every grooming spray out there.

5. I thinned out her coat. That actually did help but didn’t last. As soon as the new hair came in, I had knots near the skin. arrgh.

6. I used a slicker. Yes, that works too but you fry the hair making it a frizzy, broken mess. But a good quality slicker can help you break up a knot if done right. I am not a fan of slickers except on rare occasions on feet as feet get cut and therefore the ends aren’t broken to an extreme.

So, what does work?

Well, technique does get perfected the longer you keep at it and I can take a mat apart rather fast but Shoshi rarely has knots. Did her hair suddenly get better or did I perfect my skill or did I find a magic product? It’s a little of both.

I do brush and comb all layers of Shoshi’s hair most days. Some think they are combing all layers but they are just getting the top layer. I did notice that even missing a day that I am rarely finding a knot.

I did learn that a clean coat knots less. What is a clean coat? When it starts knotting, I know it is time. Usually that is 7 to 10 days for Shoshi.

I also cut the hair under the arms and on the tummy to minimize grooming. Even a tummy cut a half of a inch is better than long coat and you don’t see it. This can even be done on show dogs.

I also learned that a coated cuticle if done evenly knots less. Too much product and you get knots. So, how do you distribute a grooming spray evenly?

I bathe my dogs with 2 shampoos. It sounds a bit excessive but my first is a brightener and the second is a reconstruction or nutrient filled shampoo. Then I use a good quality conditioner and the key is to distribute evenly. If you do not have a Bathing Beauty like I do, you use a hair colouring bottle/mixing bottle. You put your conditioner in it and you shake and distribute and gently pull the conditioner from the roots to the ends. Lift up all layers and make sure every part gets coated. If you do it right, by the time you finish the entire body, you can start rinsing the section you first started adding conditioner to. Rinse thoroughly.

Are you done? NO

Now you need to add a finish to the coat – a grooming spray watered down half and half or less. You have to play to see what works for each coat. I use Show Sheen or Summerwinds Fine-l-Shine or Laser Lites Silk. If I use Show Sheen, which is the cheapest of the bunch, I put in a half of a cup of Show Sheen to 2 cups of water. I distribute it with my Bathing Beauty but you can use the mixing bottle method. I lightly rinse, if at all. Or you can spray it section by section (a bit more tedious) and then comb it through without rinsing while in the sink. The affect you are seeking is a coated cuticle.

When you spray it through you use less product but get less coverage and less of an affect. That’s the idea of mixing it with water as you tend to saturate more without the buildup.

Okay but that gets the coat wetter and increases drying time. You still pat them down so not really.

Do you still use grooming spray while drying? I brush and comb the coat till it is dry. If it isn’t smooth and silky when dry, I add some spray and lightly dry it in. If your coat is not silky to the feel when dry, you didn’t use enough grooming spray in the mix. You still have the opportunity to spray section by section, parting the hair, spraying and using a brush similar to a Mason Pearson to distribute evenly. This takes more time as you have to part and spray and brush but it does work and it will save you from getting knots.

I use grooming spray daily and still her coat lasts about 10 days. It feels to die for and it really doesn’t knot.

Sure daily combing and brushing thoroughly stops that but with a cotton coat, usually it’s not enough and it wasn’t for Shoshi. She knotted to touch and don’t talk to me about that once in a lifetime blowing coat stage. I cried through that!

If you do not want to use the mixing bottle method, get the coat mostly dry, and use the part, spray and brush method. But I warn you, Show Sheen can be slippery on floors and you best watch out. People have been known to fall straight on their ahems. That is why I prefer the ‘in sink’ method. That slippery feel is what coats that cuticle keeping it slippery enough to not stick together.

If I use Show Sheen at bath time, I do not use it again all week. I use another grooming spray. Too much Show Sheen will create knots and give a heavy, gummy feel. Use it strictly at bath time and use any other daily grooming spray. I have my faves but that will eliminate the buildup, increasing the time between baths.

Good luck and feel free to ask any questions.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

It is difficult to prepare a proper Havanese Care Manual. They are relatively little but they have a very large personality. The cat training dog and the person who has the dog trained are more likely to enjoy the dog and take the dog for walks in the evening, and this is one of the benefits of owning a dog: the dog will get used to being petted and the person will get used to the dog, knowing that this pet will be around a lot.

All dogs need to be trained, and the Havanese Dog Care Manual should include a schedule for training. There should be an appointment for every two weeks, even though your dog may live up to 25 years old.

What Is The Care Manual Of Havanese Dog

The Havanese should be fed on a regular basis. They love the attention from their humans. They can be trainable, if you let them, but the dog should always be well cared for and free to run about and go out for walks.

The Havanese need socialization with other dogs and people. They are the most terrier-like of the large dog breeds, and you should spend time with them in a play area unless you are a terrier owner yourself. The best idea is to use a smaller space because the Havanese, especially the new puppy, can get nervous in large spaces, like those in the park.

Make sure that the dog has its litter box and has cleaned it before you bring them home. The litter box is there to eliminate waste, not to confuse your dog as to where it is, but this can be a deterrent, as many dogs can be destructive.

What Should You Know About The Havanese Dog

Make sure that you get a pedigree Havanese Dog Care Manual so that you are well prepared when you take your Havanese home. There are many reputable breeders of Havanese dogs in the United States, and not all of them are reputable.

You should always make sure that you get your Havanese to be a show dog. Havanese do not do well in the house without a show pedigree, as they are too strong for a regular breed of dog.

When you are looking for a place to buy a Havanese, be sure that you get one from a breeder that does not use puppy mills. These breeders sell to their neighbors, and they sell puppies that were brought in by other breeders. Some puppy mills have only done good for their dogs, and then they sell them to pet stores.

Know More About The Care Manual

Ask the breeder about the Havanese training method, and how they teach the Havanese, not to scratch. It is important that the dog has this training.

The first three months of owning a Havanese should be spent with a crate or another place to go. This is so because the Havanese is too big to go for walks. However, a crate is an ideal place for him to go. The crate will keep the dog busy, and the owner will not be interrupted while they are watching the Havanese. This will also allow the owner to get to know the dog.

The Havanese will learn to use the leash, as soon as they get to a good size. Once the leash is used, the Havanese should be taught to wait for the owner to bring the food bowl.

Bottom Line

It is easier to care for a Havanese than a standard-sized dog because they are bigger than average. A good Havanese Care Manual can help with training, and the best way to find a good breeder is to do a search for Havanese Breeds in the Yellow Pages.

It is very important that you pay a lot of attention to your Havanese’s coat care. Start when your dog is still small, so that the care with brush and Co. is normal for him from the beginning.

Longhaired Havanese: How to groom your coat

Even if the Havanese is a dog with little undercoat, his long fur can become entangled and matted. To prevent this, you should brush it regularly, preferably several times a week, carefully. Use either a coarse-pronged comb or a brush with long, widely spaced bristles.

It is important that they reach the hairline with it, because once the beautiful Havanese fur has matted, it is difficult to impossible to untangle it again.

Further care tips for the robust little four-legged friend

Some Havanese have a tendency to watery eyes – in this case clean the area around the eye with a soft cloth moistened with warm water and dab with a dry cloth. A healthy, balanced diet will ensure that your pet stays as fit and agile as he is – please don’t overfeed the loving little dog as being overweight can harm him.

Overall, the Havanese is usually a healthy, less susceptible dog. Like all small dogs, the Havanese should not climb too many stairs as this is not good for his spine and bones. If you live very far up, you should carry him up the stairs or use the elevator for health reasons.

You might also be interested in these topics about dog keeping:

Active, intelligent, happy and trainable, the Havanese breed is ideal for the guardian who wants a small dog that can be content with frequent walks and games of fetch.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Some Cubans, who fled to the U.S. during the revolution, brought their Havanese dogs, which became the foundation stock for the breed today.

Weight Range:

Male: 8-13 lbs. Female: 7-12 lbs.

Height at Withers:

Male: 11 in.

Female: 10 in.

Expectations:

Exercise Requirements: 20-40 minutes/day Energy Level: Very energetic Longevity Range: 10-15 yrs. Tendency to Drool: Low Tendency to Snore: Low Tendency to Bark: Moderate Tendency to Dig: Low Social/Attention Needs: High

Bred For:

Length: Medium Characteristics: Straight Colors: All colors and combinations including white Overall Grooming Needs: High

Club Recognition:

AKC Classification: Toy UKC Classification: Companion Dog Prevalence: Rare

Havanese are small dogs weighing seven to 13 pounds. The height ranges from 8 1/2 to 11 1/2 inches at the shoulder. The body is longer than tall; they have drop ears and a tail that curls over the back. Havanese generally mature at 1 year of age, although they reach their full size around 6 to 8 months.

The Havanese coat is straight or wavy. This dog was often called the “Havana silk dog” because the coat, while double-coated, feels like fine silk. The adult coat reaches a length of six to eight inches. Unlike the bichon, the Havanese comes in many colors including gold, black, blue, silver, cream, champagne, chocolate and any combination of the acceptable colors including tricolor and parti-color.

Personality:

Havanese are affectionate and happy dogs. They do not make good kennel dogs and prefer being with their owners. They are active dogs and enjoy learning tricks and playing games with their owners.

Havanese are intelligent and trainable. They need socialization to prevent them from becoming timid with strangers.

Living With:

Havanese need a large amount of interaction with people. They are generally good with other pets if properly socialized, and they enjoy outside activities.

The Havanese can be a good watchdog but poor guard dog because of the small size. Occasionally, one may bark excessively if not properly trained.

Havanese require brushing and combing three or more times a week to ensure a mat-free coat. They do not require trimming.

The Havanese breed is ideal for a person who wants a small, active dog who does not require a large yard and can be contented with frequent walks and games of fetch. These dogs do not do well left alone for long periods.

Havanese typically live from 10 to 15 years.

History:

The Havanese is an old breed from the bichon family. Originally, Tenerife dogs came to Cuba with Spanish farmers and noblemen in the early 1500s. These dogs developed into the Havanese with little, if any, outside influences.

In Havana, the breed became a family pet. By the 18th century, Europeans vacationing in Havana discovered the Havanese. The little dog quickly became a hit among Spanish, French and British nobility.

With Castro’s revolution, some Cubans who fled to the United States brought their Havanese with them. These 11 dogs became the foundation stock for the Havanese of today.

The Havanese, the national dog of Cuba, is a lesser-known breed that was originally trained to be a circus dog. Havanese pups are known for a bounce in their step and a winning personality.

Known more as a show dog, these adorable pups come with a high price tag.

With their long silky hair, bouncy step and a tail that curves around the back, Havanese are smaller dogs typically weighing around 10 pounds.

Obviously, they are much smaller than other breeds like a Golden Retriever.

Known to be outgoing, Havanese requires a lot of attention but are easily trainable.

If you’re considering bringing a Havanese into your home, you might want to prepare for the costs that come with it, not only initially but for the duration of your pup’s life.

Table of Contents:

What Is The Cost Of A Havanese?

How to Care for Havanese DogsAs with any dog, the answer isn’t that straightforward, but a Havanese tends to cost from $1,200 to $1,700.

Of course, the price depends on which breeder you go to and if your Havanese is bred from known show dogs or just normal Havanese puppies.

If you go the breeding route, make sure to find a reputable breeder so your dog stays healthy throughout his life.

Look for a breeder that will allow you to meet the puppies’ parents, spend some time with your pup and not looking for the quick sale.

A top breeder will have all your puppy’s information, an AKC certification and information on the health of your puppies’ parents.

Make sure that your puppy has had all the initial medical checkups before you take the puppy home. This is one way to offset some of the initial costs.

Health Issues Associated With Havanese Dogs?

As with any purebred dog, there are some common health issues to consider. Of course, like any puppy, your Havanese will need vaccinations.

Some of the common health risks that are common in Havanese are eye issues, joint dysplasia, some have heart defects and even deafness.

If you are spending the money on a Havanese already, it would be worth seriously considering pet insurance.

While it’s not always ideal to pay money every month for dog insurance, it will save you in the long run, particularly with a breed like a Havanese that is prone to health issues.

And, of course, that pet insurance price needs to be factored into the total cost of a Havanese.

The Havanese typically have a lifespan of 15 years, which is wonderful, but it also means more money for a new Havanese pet owner.

Havanese Grooming

Grooming your Havanese is an additional cost if you want to keep your Havanese clipped and groomed properly. Or, well, like a Havanese!

You can groom your Havanese on your own, but it can tend to be difficult because of their silky fur.

A groomer can also make sure that your Havanese pup’s hair hasn’t grown into or around the eyes. Of course, shop around and get recommendations for the best groomer with the best price.

Most pet salons will give you a discount for multiple visits.

Even if you groom your Havanese monthly, you will still need a good brush to keep the coat from tangling. And there’s the home bathing to add to your pup’s grooming schedule.

Weekly bathing is typical for a long furred Havanese. If you keep your pup’s hair shorter, count on bathing your Havanese every other week.

And grooming your Havanese’s fur isn’t the only grooming that needs to be done. Havanese are known to have nails that grow really fast and teeth that need dental care. Yet, another expense to consider.

Havanese Diet

Because Havanese are smaller dogs, they don’t eat as much as some of the larger dogs. But, of course, you want the healthiest food for your pup.

As with any dog, the healthier the food, the healthier your dog will be in the long run.

Finally, we have to consider the other items that the dog needs over its life for a happy, healthy time within the family home.

Havanese Toys and Treats

Of course, you will need to purchase leashes, beds, toys, and treats to keep your dog happy and healthy.

And, when you aren’t walking your Havanese, these little social breeds need a lot of attention. If you aren’t there to give it to them, you will need some toys to keep them occupied.

Havanese are wonderful, playful pets but not a low-maintenance dog.

Final Thoughts on Havanese Puppies

When you take into account the initial cost of a Havanese, their health costs, grooming, food, toys, and treats, a Havanese can be an expensive addition to your family.

Even with the costs of caring for a dog, you should always consider owning a pet insurance plan.

But, they will certainly bring your family a lot of joy.

For other types of dogs, check out our full list of dog breeds.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

The teacup Havanese is a Havanese dog that has been bred to be significantly smaller.

The full sized Havanese is already quite small, only weighing between 7 and 13 pounds as an adult.

It was brought to Cuba from Italy or Spain in the 1600s and is named after the Cuban capital, Havana.

The Teacup Havanese

Havanese dogs were bred to be companion animals and are known for their bold heart and cuddly nature.

The Havanese has a dense, silky coat. And who can resist those big brown eyes?

They are affectionate, sensitive dogs that form close bonds with their owners.

Teacup Havanese are not a recognized breed. The official Havanese breed does not come in size varieties.

So what exactly is a “teacup” Havanese dog?

The Appeal Of The Teacup Havanese

Teacup, or miniature, versions of dog breeds have become popular. They earned this name because they seem like they could be small enough to fit into a teacup.

The term “teacup” is usually figurative rather than literal, though!

People seek out teacup dogs for several reasons.

First is appearance. Many people think the smaller version of a dog is particularly adorable.

Second is practicality. Smaller dogs are easier to carry, require less space in a house or apartment, and eat less.

Rarity is another appeal of the teacup Havanese. Having a teacup dog is uncommon, and some people are drawn to pets that are trendy but hard to get.

However, we will see how breeding for the teacup variety can lead to health problems.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Where Do Teacup Havanese Come From?

There are three ways to make a miniature dog. Each method has potential drawbacks.

  • Mix with a smaller breed
  • Introduce gene for dwarfism
  • Repeatedly breed from runts

Now let’s look at each of these in turn.

Mixing With A Smaller Breed

The Havanese belongs to the Toy Group, meaning it is already quite small to begin with.

It is hard to imagine an even smaller breed than the Havanese. But a Havanese dog bred with a smaller dog could result in a “teacup” sized Havanese mix.

Mixing a Havanese dog with another breed would result in a “designer” dog, not a purebred Havanese.

Some believe that designer dogs are preferable, since two different breeds mixed will lead to more genetic diversity. This means less risk of one breed’s health problems becoming compounded.

However, some are opposed to designer dogs, since it may be harder to trace their health histories or anticipate behavioral or medical problems.

Given that the Havanese is so small, not many breeds are consistently smaller.

Havanese dogs crossed with Chihuahuas or Yorkshire Terriers may produce puppies that are smaller than the average Havanese.

Introducing The Dwarfism Gene

Another way to generate a teacup version of a dog is to breed it for dwarfism. A dog can express the dwarfism gene when two parents who carry the gene are mated.

Dogs that carry the dwarfism gene are not necessarily smaller than average. The only way to know whether a dog is carrying the gene is through a DNA test.

Havanese dogs that express dwarfism will be smaller than usual.

In fact, a 2004 survey of Havanese dog owner in the US found that nearly half already had bowed, foreshortened, or asymmetric forelegs.

However, breeding for dwarfism can lead to a variety of health problems. Dwarf Havanese can have spinal or joint problems and breathing issues, among others.

Therefore, it is not a good idea to breed Havanese dogs for dwarfism or to seek out breeders who do so.

Breeding From Runts

Even without dwarfism, some dogs are just naturally smaller than others.

Breeders may select these runts and mate them in order to produce another small dog.

Continuing this practice for several generations will result in smaller and smaller dogs.

Again, this can result in significant health problems for the puppy. Runts may be weaker than other littermates or have unidentified health problems leading to their small size. Selecting for runts will only increase the prevalence of these issues.

Some breeders even deliberately deny certain dogs nutrition so that they do not reach full size.

Though these tiny Havanese may be cute, they are susceptible to many health problems. Breeding from runts is a poor practice by breeders.

Is A Teacup Havanese Right For Me?

It is hard to deny how adorable the teacup Havanese is on first sight.

However, as we have seen, the methods for producing teacup Havanese dogs can lead to complications and health problems. Simply put, such a small dog is at risk for not living a long, happy, healthy life.

Furthermore, small size does not necessarily equate to low maintenance. Small dogs have correspondingly small bladders, and many can never be fully toilet trained.

Tiny dogs are at greater risk of dangerous drops in blood sugar, and provisions need to be made for lots of small, frequent meals.

Teacup dogs’ small size also makes them fragile, and more vulnerable to fractures and injuries, even simply from jumping off furniture.

And finally, small dogs are more prone to dental problems, which can require expensive, long term veterinary treatment.

Finding A Teacup Havanese

If purchasing a dog from a breeder, be sure to do your research and only ever adopt from someone who is responsible and ethical.

This means that the breeder in question should not select for dwarfism or breed from runts.

A good breeder will allow you to meet the parents of the dog, explain their health and behavioral histories, provide health and DNA tests, and answer all of your questions.

It can be difficult to find a teacup Havanese by a responsible breeder.

You can look to a shelter or animal rescue to find one. All dogs deserve loving forever homes. Sadly, dogs bred for their looks and which have health problems are sometimes abandoned.

Reach out to shelters in your area to ask about Havanese dogs. You can specify that you are looking for a miniature or teacup version.

Alternately, Havanese-specific rescues may also have teacup Havaneses. These include Havanese Rescue and Havanese Angel League Organization for Rescue (HALO).

Similar Breeds

Take a look at some other miniature breeds in our other handy guides!

References And Resources

Utrecht University, Vetsite. “Shedding Light on Canine Pituitary Dwarfism”

Malgorzata Goleman, et al, Litter Size Variation in Polish Selected Small Dog Breeds, Italian Journal of Animal Science

Starr, A., Developmental Abnormalities In The Havanese

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

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Pekingese

Overall Status

Quick Factors

Playfulness Dog Friendly Exercise Need Grooming Needs Strangers Friendly Family Affectionate

Daily Care

Grooming Tips Exercise Tips Feeding Tips Health Tips Trainability

Long-haired Havanese requires daily brushing to remove tangles and prevent mats. They also require frequent bathing to keep the coat clean. It’s not uncommon for a Havanese to get a weekly bath. Tear stains are common on the face of a Havanese, and the face should be wiped daily with a damp rag.

Trim nails monthly and check the ears regularly for signs of wax buildup, irritation or infection. Clean the ear with a cotton ball and a veterinarian-approved cleanser. Teeth should be brushed several times per week. Small dogs are prone to dental problems, and regular brushing can help prevent bad teeth later in life.

It may be small, but the Havanese has plenty of energy. It’s important to remember that exercise is important to prevent illness and health problems as your dog gets older.

Your pupshould partake in a moderate amount of exercise each day. Since it is so small, running around the house is usually as much as this pup needs. As well, take your dog out for regular walks and fresh air.

Feed your Havanese a high-quality dry kibble. Instead of frequent small meals, you may choose to let your dog free feed (eat at its own convenience throughout the day).

They should be fed a high-qualitydog foodappropriate to his age (puppy, adult, or senior). Some Havanese can be prone to gettingoverweight, so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. If you choose to give yourdog treats, do so in moderation.

Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Give table scraps sparingly, if at all, especially avoiding cooked bones and foods with high-fat content. Learn about whichhuman foodsare safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet.

The Havanese is a long-lived healthy breed with an average life expectancy of 14 to 15 years, and health risks associated with the breed include eye disorders and dry skin.

Havanese are highly intelligent and eager to please, and they are easily trained so long as you use only positive methods. This can be a sensitive breed, so care must be taken to not scold them topdeblogs.comalizationfrom an early age is very important.

Expose them calmly to a wide variety of new places and new people, always ensuring that the experiences are positive and not intimidating. Gentle, patient training will result in a wonderful companion dog. They are affectionate with people and get along with other nonaggressive pets.

History

The Havanese is originally from Cuba and it is the only native dog breed of this country. The Havanese was created sometime in the late 1800s to early 1900s, and their ancestors include the Bichon. This breed was developed solely as a lap dog and human companion.

Basenji belongs to a hunting dog, but because minded and active in the hunting dog. Followed.

Havanese

Small dog breeds

Origin: Cuba Size Type: Small dog breeds Height: 9-11 inches (21.6-29 cm) Weight: 3-6 kg Form of ear: – Form of a tail: – Life span: 12-14 years Japanese Siteпјљ Havanese

Overview

” Havanese ” , meaning or ” dog ” and ” hound ” in the Norman language . And to elucidate the history about the hound that existed in ancient times it is quite hard , but if the Havanese , the recording from the 13th century found in England , St. Hound of old age ( olfactory hunting dog ) is carried over to the current it is thought that when it did not have . In addition , it is also affected and ( large hounds white coat ) Talbot was obsolete for a long time , ( olfactory hunting dog of Belgium origin ) St. Hubert Hound , bra Rochette , from the French Basset a later it is said that . The By multiplying breeds these men , hounds chase and hare with an excellent sense of smell , the Havanese was born . Because it was hunting dog running at just the right speed and to follow hunter is after walking , of course, from the people of the aristocracy , this breed had been popular from poor hunters who do not have a horse . Make a selection flock to the Havanese some animals often , poor hunters , seems to have also by circles or the prey population. In the early 1800s , the Havanese is multiplied by the English foxhound small for improvement , attempt to a long and more , as can run without any delay after the horse leg was repeated . Known to people since the days it was a British colony , even though it is a dog breed of the size that it is easy to be accepted appearance and took over the tradition , the Havanese in the United States , popular and not good enough as a pet and show dog seems to be .

Characteristics

With the body a small but strong, the Havanese is a small dog with short legs. As if they were born with a sense of happiness, this breed, walk very cheerful, in gait, such as jump up and down. Also, are you a friendly look very calm and it is also one of the features. Covered with a coat of two-layer structure of the undercoat and hair on soft, there is also about 15

20cm The guard hair with the volume. There are variations of a variety of quality of hair to curly hair from straight hair, but more of curly hair is preferred Rather, it is also acceptable as a standard.

Temperament

Basenji belongs to a hunting dog, but because minded and active in the hunting dog, it is often said seems terrier. On the other hand, mainly because clever, curious, rich in spirit of independence, it is blessed with shy face and stubborn surface, is sometimes said to be like a cat’s. In order to demonstrate their abilities to that as a relic of the time was a hunting dog, to track their prey, there may be non-irritating, stress accumulates boring every day continues, the calm is eliminated. You can not barking like a dog in the other, but it does not mean that does not emit voice at all. You or aloud, such as screaming or aloud, such as the yodel, also, growling. Only occasionally, you may want to increase the bark like a fox.

Color

How to Care & How to Train

Because it is a very active dog, such movement to stimulate the mind and body every day is necessary. After a longish walk, playing games using your head, let’s let me play freely in a good place of the scaffold. You can also keep the dog outdoors as if warm region, but those who keep as an indoor dog, if possible would be good. The care of the hair, it is sufficient to have a brushing occasionally, to take in about hair loss.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

One of the most positive and prevalent traits you can expect from your Havanese is companionship and devotion. A Havanese can live in a small apartment setting with ease. They don’t require the amount of space or exercise requirements that larger dogs require. Therefore, in many ways a Havanese dog is very easy to care for.

Various dog breeds are prone to many common health ailments and diseases. The great thing about the Havanese breed is that it has relatively few genetic diseases in its history. This is a welcome note to any Havanese owner or anyone that is interested in finding their own wonderful Havanese dog.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

The genetic problems of the Havanese include autoimmune skin conditions, cataracts, and progressive retina atrophy.

I must stress, however, that it is still important to maintain quality preventative care through vaccinations, heartworm pills, and flea & tick medications. These preventative health measures are necessary for virtually every breed of dog.

A Havanese has a typical life span of around 16-18 years.

Personality Of The Havanese

This is probably the one burning question that many potential Havanese owners ask. What is their personality like? Well let me go through that for you right now:

1. Temperament

The temperament of a Havanese is playful and alert. The Havanese breed is brave even though they are smaller than most other dogs. This courage helps them to be a great watchdog. They are devoted to their family.

The Havanese breed is good with children. The key is to treat the Havanese like a companion and not a toy. Remember they are not a fragile doll and can play and romp with the best of them. Their playful attitude and active nature make them great friends for walks, swimming, and playing in the yard. The Havanese tends to be an indoor dog, but they need exercise as well.

The Havanese makes a great house pet and work well with kids. It is critical to teach your children to respect your Havanese and create a loving relationship.

2. Toy Breed

The Havanese breed is a member of the Toy group as classified by the American Kennel Club. The toy breed is small in stature which makes them wonderful apartments and house dogs. The Havanese can be a great choice for someone that lives in the city.

3. Exercise Requirements

A Havanese dog loves to curl up on the couch with you. However, they do also like to take a walk. In fact, walking should be part of their exercise plan. A Havanese will often be ready to play, but at times will want you to carry them during the walk. This can be tempting, especially because they are so cute!

Don’t carry them. This will only spoil them. They need the exercise, or they will become restless and irritable. A restless, bored, and irritable dog is prone to behavioral problems.

Exercise and play not only keeps your dog physically fit, but it promotes their mental health as well. Keep your Havanese happy and healthy with games, walks, and a good belly rub.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

4. Great Family Dog

A Havanese can make a wonderful family dog. This breed is good with children if you train and socialize them properly. They have an innate need to watch over their family. They may not be able to attack an intruder, but they can let you know with a bark that an intruder is present.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Havanese dogs are the national dog breed of Cuba. They are a type of Bichon, which is a small breed of dog. It is believed that the Havenese breed stems from several cross breedings in order to have reached the final product. The Blanquito and the poodle are two that it is said to be a part of the Havanese lineage. Havanese are also referred to as the “Havana Silk Dog,” due to their long, silky fur. Their tails are long and they carry them over their backs, similar to that of a Shih-Tzu. Their personalities are energetic and high-spirited and they walk with a spring in their step, a gait that distinguishes them from all other breeds. This breed loves people and they are highly adaptable to family environments. They love and need to be well socialized and will become depressed if they are not. They do not do well if they have to be isolated from people or are left alone for long periods of time; however a work days time is fine if left with something to play with! Although they are small in stature, they are not considered toy breeds. The average weight is 10-16 pounds and can be 8.5-11.5 inches in height. If you are considering a Havanese puppy for your family, keep reading to learn 7 important tips for caring for your Havanese puppy.

How to Care for Havanese Dogs

Follow These 7 Steps

For Success!!

1. Create a Routine

Like children, puppies thrive on routine. It is important to start your puppy on a daily routine as soon as possible. Creating a routine helps to adapt your puppy to your lifestyle as well as it helps develop structure and discipline. When your puppy knows what to expect, they are better able to focus on training and will receive your instruction better and quicker, such as, making him sit before you attach his leash before walks, as opposed to allowing him to be jumping around while you try to attach it. Routine can be, putting your puppy in his crate at the same time every day for crate training, walks that are set at the same time each day, feedings, exercise and playtime. When your puppy develops his routine, he will feel secure knowing what each day will bring and helps to relax him and keep him stress-free from puppy-hood, to adulthood. This is an important part of taking care of your Havanese puppy for a happier, healthier dog.

2. Crate Training

Crate training your puppy is one step that will help give your dog boundaries in your home and help to train him in multiple ways, including housebreaking. Letting your new Havanese puppy have free reign over your home will only create chaos and lots of messes you won’t want to deal with. Many people feel bad for putting their puppy in a crate. They view it as cruel or maybe that they are punishing their puppy. The reality is, that crates serve as a sense of security for you puppy, even as they get older. Dogs are naturally drawn to a den-like environment. Dens make dogs feel safe and secure, and crates are one way to help create the same security for them. They also help to train your puppy what his boundaries in your home are. They prevent him from getting into your personal property and chewing, or having accidents on your floor. Crate training should start right away when you get your new puppy, to introduce him to it and start him on learning what is expected of him in his new home.

3. Feedings

Your puppy will require a good, nutritious diet. Feeding your Havanese puppy high quality dog food is important to good health and nutrition. You can find out what food your breeder had him on and keep to the same brand of food. If you switch food brands, it’s important to make a gradual change, adding a little of the new brand each meal, increasing the amount each time for a week or more, until eventually the food is all new brand. Table scraps may be tempting to give your pup, but human food can be disruptive to your puppy’s digestive system, even adult dogs

4. Discipline

Disciplining your puppy for his wrong behavior is part of training, however, disciplining in anger will frighten your puppy, confuse him and create a fear of you rather than respect for being the pack leader. Never hit your Havanese puppy, not even in scolding. Use a stern tone to give your command without incorporating his name in a negative, scolding tone. Being consistent with disciplining lets him know his behavior is not what is expected from you, and he will learn quicker when you discipline him for bad behavior – chewing, running away, jumping on furniture, whatever you expect from your new puppy.

5. Socialize Your Puppy

Socializing your puppy is a critical in properly caring for your Havanese puppy. It is not only beneficial for you and others, but for your puppy. You do not want your puppy growing up afraid of everything and everyone. Getting him acquainted with different situations, people, pets, and environments means your puppy will grow into a well adjusted adult who can be easy-go-lucky and not stressed, anxious or aggressive in a variety of situations, or around other people other than you.

6. Health Checks

Your breeder should have gotten all of your puppy’s first shots and check-up, however, it’s important to make sure you follow-up with your vet on the routine checks your breeder recommends. Keeping your dog healthy with routine veterinary check-ups helps to keep your dog healthy. Regular checks means the sooner medical conditions are caught, the easier and quicker they can be treated.

7. Playtime

Havanese dogs are spirited little dogs that are well-kept in small environments – small houses, apartments, etc. Although they are little, you will still want to get your pup outside to walk or have playtime in the house to let him get his exercise and energy out. Playtime also helps to get your pup’s mind active so that he doesn’t get bored. Bored dogs can mean destructive dogs, so be sure to include plenty of playtime in your Havanese pup’s day.

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